The Northshore STEM Coalition will host a free Engineering Day for Girls on Feb. 27, from 10 a.m. to noon, both in-person and virtually.

In-person registration will be limited to due to COVID-19 precautions.

Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical Community College will lead the event that features women in the engineering field as guest speakers. The girl participants can ask questions while exploring and honing their own engineering skills.

Chuck Crabtree, co-chair of the Northshore STEM Coalition, said this year’s engineering challenge is to construct a functional bridge out of popsicle sticks and wood glue. NASA System Quality Engineer Renee Horton will lead the activity.

Winners will be selected in different categories, such as the bridge that holds the most weight using canned goods as weights, the most cost-effective bridge that uses the least popsicle sticks, and the fastest built bridge.

Engineering Day for Girls is open to girls of all ages, but those under third grade must have a “Lab Assistant” (parent, older sibling, or guardian) to supervise during the activity. Boys of all ages are also welcome to join in on the fun, and can participate as “Lab Assistant” to a girl “Lead Engineer.”

Locally, the event will be at Southeastern. Other sites are the STEM campus in Lacombe and the Livingston campus in Walker. All three campuses will be connected with each other for the event, as well as with those participating from home via video conferencing.

Go to http://bit.ly/3jmWA FR to sign up for the event.

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